Wednesday, 8 September 2021

Blackcurrant Seed Oil - Rich in GLA



Blackcurrant seed oil is a rich source of gamma linolenic acid (GLA) which is an omega-6 essential fatty acid (EFA). 

It also contains alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid; linoleic acid (LA), an omega-6 fatty acid and a broad spectrum of other fatty acids, providing a balanced combination of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-6 and omega-3 EFAs are essential to health, as our body cannot produce them, therefore they must be consumed from food or supplements. Studies continue to confirm their role in supporting healthy skin, cardiovascular health, mental health, hormone balance, joint mobility, cell membrane fluidity and healthy inflammatory pathways.

GLA is converted in the body from LA and despite most people consuming high levels of dietary LA, many people lack the ability to convert LA into GLA as they lack the enzyme delta-6-desaturase which carries out the conversion in the body. By taking a supplement of GLA this enzymatic conversion is bypassed and the GLA can be utilised by the body.


GLA Supports Health

GLA is an omega-6 fatty acid that is metabolised in the body to prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that control many body processes, including the modulation of inflammation as well as having a positive effect on cardiovascular health. GLA has been shown to be particularly beneficial for female reproductive health.


Products To Buy

Friday, 20 August 2021

Ashwagandha Capsules 8000mg - 30 Capsules Stress Fatigue Anxiety Relief Vegan

What is ashwagandha? Ashwagandha is a small evergreen shrub that originates from parts of India, the Middle East and Africa. Its unusual name relates to the way it smells – ashwagandha roots smell like a horse, with ‘ashwa’ meaning horse.1 These tube-like roots are harvested, dried and ground down into a powder.2 The ashwagandha plant is renowned for being one of the most powerful herbs, which spans back thousands of years. As well as being an ancient herb, it’s also known for being an adaptogen - it contains a mix of amino acids, herbs and vitamins that can help the body manage stress. 3 Ashwagandha is frequently referred to as ‘Indian ginseng’ because of its rejuvenating properties, even though botanically, ginseng and ashwagandha aren’t connected to each other. 4 What is ashwagandha extract? Various parts of the ashwagandha plant are used for medicinal purposes, but it’s ashwagandha extract – which is an extract of the plant’s roots – that’s found in most supplements.5 More traditional Ayurvedic treatments use the entire dried root of the ashwagandha plant, which is turned into powder and usually steeped in milk. However, more modern supplements are ashwagandha extracts that are labelled as Withania Somnifera extract. Ashwagandha extracts are more refined than ashwagandha powder and can be created using water or chemicals.6 Summary The ashwagandha plant is one of the most powerful herbs. Various parts of the ashwagandha plant are used for medicinal purposes, with ashwagandha extract mainly being used in supplements.

Wednesday, 11 August 2021

Raspberries: Nutrition Facts, Benefits

Raspberries are the edible fruit of a plant species in the rose family.

There are many types of raspberries — including black, purple and golden — but the red raspberry, or Rubus idaeus, is the most common.

Red raspberries are native to Europe and northern Asia and cultivated in temperate areas worldwide. Most US raspberries are grown in California, Washington and Oregon.

These sweet tart berries have a short shelf life and are harvested only during the summer and fall months. For these reasons, raspberries are best eaten shortly after purchasing.

This article explores the nutritional value and health benefits of raspberries.

Low-Calorie and Packed With Nutrients

Raspberries boast many nutrients despite being low in calories.

One cup (123 grams) of red raspberries contains.

  • Calories: 64
  • Carbs: 14.7 grams
  • Fiber: 8 grams
  • Protein: 1.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.8 grams
  • Vitamin C: 54% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Manganese: 41% of the RDI
  • Vitamin K: 12% of the RDI
  • Vitamin E: 5% of the RDI
  • B vitamins: 4–6% of the RDI
  • Iron: 5% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 7% of the RDI
  • Phosphorus: 4% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 5% of the RDI
  • Copper: 6% of the RDI

Raspberries are a great source of fiber, packing 8 grams per 1-cup (123-gram) serving, or 32% and 21% of the RDI for women and men, respectively.

They provide more than half of the RDI for vitamin C, a water-soluble nutrient essential for immune function and iron absorption (2Trusted Source).

Raspberries also contain small amounts of Vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium and zinc.

Potent Antioxidants May Reduce Disease Risk

Antioxidants are plant compounds that help your cells fight and recover from oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress is linked to a higher risk of cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other illnesses.

Raspberries are high in several potent antioxidant compounds, including vitamin C, quercetin and ellagic acid

pared to other berries, raspberries have a similar antioxidant content as strawberries, but only half as much as blackberries and a quarter as much as blueberries

A review of animal studies suggests that raspberries and raspberry extracts have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects that may reduce your risks of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer

High Fiber and Tannin Content May Benefit Blood Sugar Control

Raspberries are low in carbs and high in fiber, making them a smart choice for anyone watching their carbs.

One cup (123 grams) of raspberries has 14.7 grams of carbs and 8 grams of fiber, which means they have only 6.7 grams of net digestible carbs per serving.

Raspberries also are unlikely to raise blood sugar levels.

The glycemic index (GI) is a measure of how quickly a given food increases your blood sugar. Though the GI for raspberries has not been determined, most berries fall into the low-glycemic category.

Additionally, studies show that raspberries may lower blood sugar and improve insulin resistance.

In animal studies, mice fed freeze-dried red raspberries alongside a high-fat diet had lower blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance than the control group.

The raspberry-fed mice also demonstrated less evidence of fatty liver disease.

Furthermore, raspberries are high in tannins, which block alpha-amylase, a digestive enzyme necessary for breaking down starch.

By blocking alpha-amylase, raspberries may reduce the number of carbs absorbed after a meal, which lessens the impact on your blood sugar.

May Have Cancer-Fighting Properties

Raspberries’ high levels of antioxidants may protect against cancer.

Berry extracts — including those of red raspberries — block the growth of and destroy cancer cells in test-tube studies on colon, prostate, breast and oral (mouth) cancer cells.

In one test-tube study, red raspberry extract was shown to kill up to 90% of stomach, colon and breast cancer cells.

Another test-tube study demonstrated that sanguiin H-6 — an antioxidant found in red raspberries — led to cell death in over 40% of ovarian cancer cells.

Animal studies with raspberries also observe protective effects against cancer.

In one 10-week study on mice with colitis, those fed a diet of 5% red raspberries had less inflammation and a lower risk of cancer than the control group.

In another study, red raspberry extract prevented the growth of liver cancers in mice. The risk of tumor development decreased with larger doses of raspberry extract.

Human studies are necessary before raspberries can be conclusively linked to cancer prevention or treatment.

Other Potential Health Benefits

Because raspberries are high in many nutrients and antioxidants, they may provide other health benefits as well.

May Improve Arthritis

Raspberries have anti-inflammatory properties which may reduce symptoms of arthritis.

In one study, rats treated with red raspberry extract had a lower risk of arthritis than rats in the control group. Additionally, those that developed arthritis experienced less severe symptoms than the control rats.

In another study in rats, those given raspberry extract had less swelling and joint destruction than the control group.

Raspberries are believed to protect against arthritis by blocking COX-2, an enzyme responsible for causing inflammation and pain.

May Aid Weight Loss

One cup (123 grams) of raspberries has only 64 calories and 8 grams of fiber. What’s more, it’s made up of more than 85% water. This makes raspberries a filling, low-calorie food.

Additionally, their natural sweetness may help satisfy your sweet tooth.

The chemical substances naturally found in raspberries may also aid weight loss.

In one study, mice were fed a low-fat diet, a high-fat diet or a high-fat diet supplemented with one of eight berries, including raspberries. Mice in the raspberry group gained less weight than mice only on a high-fat diet (

Raspberry ketone supplements are widely promoted for weight loss. However, little research has been conducted on them.

In one animal study, mice fed a high-fat diet and given high doses of raspberry ketones gained less weight than mice in the control group.

The only human-based study on raspberry ketones and weight loss used a supplement containing several other substances, including caffeine, making it impossible to determine whether raspberry ketones were responsible for any positive effects.

While little evidence suggests that raspberry ketone supplements aid weight loss, eating whole, fresh raspberries may help you shed weight.

May Combat Aging

Raspberries are high in antioxidants, which can help reduce signs of aging by fighting free radicals in your body.

Antioxidants have been linked to longer lifespans in various animal models and show anti-aging effects in humans.

Raspberries are also high vitamin C, which is necessary for healthy skin. It may improve collagen production and reverse damage to skin caused by UV rays.

In one eight-week study, aging rats fed a diet with 1% or 2% raspberries showed improved motor functions, including balance and strength.


 

Monday, 8 February 2021

The Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

 For centuries, apple cider vinegar has been used as a home remedy to treat many health ailments, as well as a disinfectant and natural preservative. Today, it may be most well-known for its use for weight loss and blood sugar regulation, among other things.

Apple cider vinegar is produced during the fermentation of apple cider. During this process, the sugar in apples is fermented by yeast and/or bacteria added to the cider, which then turns it into alcohol and, finally, into vinegar. Many consume the vinegar itself, while others use apple cider vinegar capsules or gummies.

Health Benefits

Like other types of vinegar, the key component in apple cider vinegar is acetic acid. Apple cider vinegar also contains other substances such as lactic, citric, and malic acids, and bacteria.

Proponents claim that apple cider vinegar may boost your health in a variety of ways. Science backs up some of these claims.

Blood Sugar

The acetic acid in vinegar appears to block enzymes that help you digest starch, resulting in a smaller blood sugar response after starchy meals such as pasta or bread.

To incorporate apple cider vinegar in your meals, try adding a splash to salads, marinades, vinaigrettes, and sauces.

If you have diabetes or prediabetes, however, be sure to consult your doctor if you’re considering using amounts larger than those normally found in cooking. Vinegar can interact with diabetes medication, and it shouldn't be used by people with certain health conditions, like gastroparesis

Weight Loss

Proponents claim that consuming vinegar before or with a meal may have a satiating effect.

A 12-week study from Japan reported that people who had consumed up to 30 milliliters (roughly 6 teaspoons) of vinegar per day experienced a modest one- to two-pound reduction in body weight. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triglycerides, and visceral fat were also slightly reduced.

People tend to consume greater than normal amounts of apple cider vinegar when using it for weight loss purposes, with some even taking it in supplement form..








Monday, 18 January 2021

Grapeseed extract

 

For years, grapeseed extract, which is available via liquid, tablets, or capsules, has been well-established and applauded for its antioxidant activity. It has potent health benefits, including lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol and reducing symptoms of poor circulation in the leg veins.

StudiesTrusted Source are confirming that regular consumption of grapeseed extract has anticancer effects and seems to halt cancer cell growth.

Grapeseed extract could be beneficial for:

  • cancer
  • lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol
  • leg vein circulation
  • edema
  • blood pressure

Things to consider

  • Proceed with caution if you take blood thinners or blood pressure medications, or if you’re about to go in for surgery.
  • It may reduce iron absorption.

Thursday, 14 January 2021

Horny Goat Weed - 5000mg/serving, 120 High Strength Tablets - Male Libido boost

 


ReBirth Wellness Horny Goat Weed Pack of 120 Tablets Suitable for Vegetarians & Vegans The name was said to have come from a herder, who noticed his flock of goats becoming suddenly sexually active after eating the plant. Recent popular use of horny goat weed grew out of an increasing demand for dietary supplements to enhance sexual function. Suggested Use: Take two to four tablets a day with your food. Do not exceed stated dose. Ingredients: Horny goat weed 5x concentrated extract 250mg = 2500mg of raw herb. One serving of four tablets = 5000mg of raw herb. Other ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate. Suitable for: Vegans & vegetarians Important Information: This product is a food supplement and should not be used as a substitute for a varied and balance diet and a healthy lifestyle. If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, taking medications or under medical supervision, please consult a doctor or healthcare professional before use. Discontinue use and consult a doctor if adverse reactions occur. direct sunlight. Suitable for vegetarians. Allergy Advice: Although rigorous precautions are taken to prevent any cross-contamination, this product is manufactured in a facility that also handles allergy-based materials such as nuts, seeds, milk, egg, cereals, soya, mustard, celery, fish, crustaceans and sulphites. For allergens (if any) see ingredients in bold. Disclaimer: This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease Manufactured in the UK

Saturday, 11 July 2020

Dandelions - 10 possible health benefits



The potential benefits of dandelion include:

1. Providing antioxidants

dandelions in a fieldShare on Pinterest
Dandelions may have various health benefits.
Antioxidants work to neutralize the harmful effects of free radicals. The human body produces free radicals naturally, but they cause harm by accelerating ageing or the progression of certain diseases.
Dandelions contain beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage. Research shows that carotenoids such as beta-carotene play a vital role in reducing cell damage.
The flower of the dandelion is also full of polyphenols, which are another type of antioxidant.

2. Reducing cholesterol

Dandelions contain bioactive compounds that may help lower a person’s cholesterol.
One study from 2010 examined the effects of dandelion consumption in rabbits. Its results found that dandelion root and leaf could help lower cholesterol in animals on a high-cholesterol diet.
Another study in mice found that dandelion consumption reduced total cholesterol and levels of fat in the liver. The researchers concluded that dandelion might one day help treat obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
However, testing on humans is necessary to help determine how effective dandelion could be for lowering cholesterol.

3. Regulating blood sugar

There is some evidence to suggest that dandelions contain compounds that may help with regulating blood sugar.
In 2016, some researchers proposed that dandelion’s antihyperglycemic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties may help treat type 2 diabetes. However, further research is required to make any definitive claims.

4. Reducing inflammation

Some studies indicate that dandelion extracts and compounds may help reduce inflammation in the body.
In one 2014 study, researchers found that chemicals present in dandelions had some positive effects on reducing inflammatory responses.
They conducted the study in cells and not in human participants, which means that more studies are necessary to conclude that dandelion reduces inflammation in the human body.

5. Lowering blood pressure

There is little research to support the use of dandelion for lowering blood pressure.
However, dandelions are a good source of potassium. There is clinical evidence that shows that potassium can help reduce blood pressure.
For example, research has found that people taking a potassium supplement saw a reduction in their blood pressure, especially if they already had high blood pressure.

6. Aiding weight loss

Some researchers have proposed that dandelion could help people achieve their weight loss goals. This is based on the plant’s ability to improve carbohydrate metabolism and reduce fat absorption.
A small study of mice found that chlorogenic acid, a chemical present in dandelions, may help reduce weight gain and lipid retention. Strong evidence to support this claim is lacking, however.

7. Reducing cancer risk

Some limited, but positive, research has indicated that dandelion may help reduce the growth of certain types of cancer.
So far, studies have looked at dandelion’s impact on cancer growth in test tubes and found that it may help with slowing the growth of colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, and liver cancer.
One study examining cancer growth in a test tube determined that dandelion extract may help reduce the growth of liver cancer.
However, as with other potential benefits, more research is required to show how effective dandelions can be as part of cancer treatment.

8. Boosting the immune system

There is growing evidence that suggests that dandelions can help boost the immune system.
Researchers have found that dandelions show both antiviral and antibacterial properties. For example, one 2014 study found that dandelions help limit the growth of hepatitis B in both human and animal cells in test tubes.
More research is now required to determine the impact of dandelions on the immune system, however.

9. Aiding digestion

Some people use dandelion as a traditional remedy for constipation and other digestion issues.
A study looking at animal digestion indicated that some chemicals present in dandelions helped improve the digestive system.
The study saw a reduction in the resistance in food moving to rodents’ small intestines. Research is now needed on humans to test for similar results.

10. Keeping skin healthy

Some research indicates that dandelion may help protect the skin from sun damage.
Ultraviolet (UV) light causes considerable damage to the skin and contributes to skin ageing. A 2015 study on skin cells in a test tube found that dandelion could reduce the impact of one type of damaging UV light.
Protecting the skin from UV damage can help a person look younger for longer. Research in humans is needed to verify these results.

dandelions on a chopping boardShare on Pinterest
It is not advisable to consume dandelions from the backyard.
Dandelion leaves are sometimes present in salads, but they are not widely available in all areas. Picking dandelions in a backyard is unsafe due to the potential presence of pesticides or animal excrement.
However, it is possible to obtain dandelion supplements or teas and coffees infused with dandelion root. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have recognized dandelion as generally being safe to include in food products.
Data on safe doses of dandelion supplements are limited. Similar to other supplements, its potency and effectiveness can vary widely between manufacturers.
Dandelion supplements can cause allergic reactions in some people. People should not use dandelion supplements if they are sensitive to dandelions or certain other plants, such as ragweed, daisies, or chrysanthemums, or marigolds.
People trying supplements should follow instructions on the bottle for recommended doses and always speak to a doctor before taking them.